22.4.15

Stylearc Dixie

I think my endless summer might have finally come to an end.  I know that many others may not find Queensland weather to be cold, but this week is the coldest I have been in years.  I can't remember when I last wore jeans and I actually went running in capri length leggings this week.  This means that I can change the way I think about what I wear, and therefore what I sew.

First up, I have sewn a Stylearc Dixie woven top.


The pattern illustration is colour-blocked, although I have chosen different colour blocking for my combination of fabrics.
  • My yoke is made from a Japanese fabric that I bought in Japan several years ago.  I'm not sure what this fabric is called, but it seemed terribly expensive for a little square and has a crepe-y sort of texture.
  • For the back and neck binding I have used a linen from Tessuti (Turquoise Flip). I haven't sewn with linen for a long time and I really enjoyed working with this fabric.  I did use a different method of applying the binding than the pattern instructions suggest.  I made bias binding with folds on each edge using a bias-binder thingy-ma-jig.  I sewed in the line of one fold, as I attached the binding to the inside of the top.  Then I folded the binding in half, with the other folded edge turned under and top-stitched from the outside.
  • The front body and sleeves are made from a crinkle woven remnant from The Fabric Store.  The crinkles mean that the fabric stretches out quite a bit with movement.  I lined the front body with a lightweight cotton, as it was a bit sheer on its own.  I cut the hem of the lining shorter and straight across.


The line drawing describes the sleeves as 3/4, but the illustration and pattern show elbow length sleeves.  My sleeves look a lot fuller and floppier than the illustration because of my fabric choice.  The crinkle fabric stretches out when I move my arm.  Re-wetting the fabric shrinks the crinkles back in, so the sleeves will come back to shape each wash.  Initially I used the blue linen for the sleeves, decorated with trims to match the yoke.  They were very elaborate, but I found these sleeves way too restrictive.  I knew that restrictive sleeves would stop me wearing the top, so I ripped them out and put in the crinkle sleeves, which don't look as smart but are infinitely more comfortable.




The pattern has a curved hem.  The instructions given are for a split hem, which did confuse me for a while.  I contacted Stylearc and they are going to change these instructions.  I just thought I would mention it as no other reviewer has mentioned this and I thought I was misunderstanding the instructions for a bit. 



The back has both horizontal and vertical seaming, which is a nice detail and allows for easy alterations for more back shaping (although I didn't think to do this until I finished all my top-stitching).  The neck closes with a button and loop.

So does this mean I need to change the name of my blog?  I'll have to think about it.

11 comments:

  1. Lovely top. Bet you're glad you weren't in Sydney this week? Talk about bad weather!!

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  2. What a lovely top and it does look good with jeans.

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  3. I like that style top especially the way the front neckline looks with the little peephole. I have to say I don't like that length sleeve I prefer shorter or 3/4 but it's not my top ;) Don't change the name... I love the thought of endless summer. (even if it is cold)

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  4. This looks like a great transition top. Very pretty. I love your fabric combination!

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  5. Beautiful! Love the peephole! I have a similar crinkled fabric in my stash, but I'm afraid to cut it. Do you have any technique or tip on how to work with this type of fabric?

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    1. Hi Raquel, this is the 3rd time I have used a crinkle fabric. The first time was for a fitted dress, and it did not work out well because the dress kept expanding and losing shape as I wore it. The second time was a crinkle silk, which was very slippery, so I did not do a good job cutting out...I was cutting on tiles and it kept slipping around. This time, I lay my fabric out on a much less slippery surface and used pattern weights to hold the pattern in position as I cut. So I guess my advice would be to choose the pattern carefully (looser designs rather than close fitting designs) and to cut on fabric or tissue paper so that the fabric coes not shift as you cut it. I didn't have a problem with seams stretching out as I sewed them, but you made need to stabilise some seams.

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    2. Thanks! Great tips. I was afraid of maximum distortion with the fabric, so I'll make something flowy. I'm not thaaath good at cutting, so the tissue paper it will be perfect!

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  6. Oh, I don't know. It still looks pretty summery to me! This is a lovely top. I like your choice of fabrics and the interesting design. It will be fun for you to make some warmer clothes for a change!

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  7. Love it!! Love the mix of fabrics. I am about to make a top from gauze and the crinkle factor scares me.

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  8. This top is so pretty. Lovely combination of fabrics. That Japanese fabric sounds like double gauze. I have only seen it offered from Japan, spongy crepe look and feel, and very high prices.

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  9. I've seen another top like this today - mixing different fabrics together for a blouse. Love yours and great scrap buster!

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