18.9.12

Dip-dyed T-shirt

I'm having a bit of a clear out of my wardrobe.  On the pile of neverworns was a shirt that I made earlier this year.  It was beautifully made, being the first project with my industrial binders.  I took photos of the binding when I made it, to compare to my original version, but in a computer glitch, I have lost all my photos from March to May.

The neverworn pile was mostly whitish shirts.  I don't look good in white.  So I went and bought some dye, to see if any of them could be salvaged.  Dye is expensive.  About $12 a packet and only does one shirt.  Then when I got home, it was a hand dye variety and not a chuck-in-the-washing machine variety.  The first dyed shirt did not turn out well, even though I followed the instructions to the letter.  The colour was not very intense and it looked a bit patchy.  For my next one, I tried dip-dying, so that the patchy effect would be less of an issue.  I still did not get good intensity of colour, but the result is wearable.  I stitched it with polyester thread, which did not take the dye, but I must have sewn the button on with cotton thread.

 Mostly, this will be casual wear, but yesterday I dressed it up with my much worn Patrones skirt


12 comments:

  1. I love the dip-dyed look and I think your shirt turned out beautiful!
    I think you will find that a very small quantity of dye will be adequate for one shirt. One packet should do six ordinary sized shirts. Blotchy and patchy areas sometimes occur if the fabric is not thoroughly wet when entering the dye-bath. Unless I am going for that look; I wash the item first, and then without spinning or drying, soak it in a bucket of water at least for a few hours to ensure it is thoroughly wet. Then dunk it straight from the soaking water all in one smooth motion into your dyebath, and ensure there is plenty of room so it can be swooshed around thoroughly. The first 10min is key, and is when most of the dye will be taken up.
    The colour for your first shirt might not have been intense because of a little bit of synthetic content, in a natural fibre dye bath, or vice versa? if this is the case, no amount of extra dye is going to make a difference. There is a maximum intensity after which the product is just going to waste, although you can add other colours.
    Sorry for the essay! but my mother is an expert dye-er of many years, and I do a lot myself too

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Carolyn! I did wet the shirt first, but did not soak it. I have one more packet, so I will soak my next one for several hours first, and let you know how it goes.

      Delete
  2. I love the dip dye look - I really am going to have to give this a shot!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love this color so much, on you especially. It reminds me of that rayon knit dress you made earlier this year. And pretty with the minty shoes. I'm just starting to get into dyeing. We have been visiting friends of ours who live one block from Dharma Trading which is a mothership of dye supplies in California. I went a little crazy :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's a great effect and such a pretty colour.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Here you go again, with another not-so-basic basic tee-shirt! It looks great with your Patrones skirt.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love your dyeing! Your bra and panty pics below are very inspiring too. I have just started making the MIX bra. We'll see soon how it turns out.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like the variance in colour - haven't tried yet, but on my list!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. You have a job well done! I love how you paired it with your skirt and your lime footwear. Keep us inspired with more of your fashionable mixes and finds.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Just catching up with my blog reading after a busy week. Great top and I love the dip dying technique.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Katherine, so nice to hear from you and I'm happy to see you very special sewing again:)

    ReplyDelete