28.8.11

Pink, frilly, boucle jacket

Sewing is a funny business.  A technique you wish to try here, a pattern waiting for its moment in the sun, a fabric sale there, and next thing you know, you have a frilly, pink jacket.  

Actually, this pattern may never have come into being if I didn't have a fight with my partner over book week costumes.  Originally, the Grand Old Duke of York was going to be Humpty Dumpty.  Only somebody wondered why I would put that much effort into my son only to have him going to school to look like an idiot.  I stormed off in a huff, with no place to go but the sewing room, where I chose the most time-consuming project that I had on hand.





The pattern is Vogue 2923 DKNY, which was printed in 2006, but is still available from Vogue clearance.  I'll show you a picture of the muslin, as it looks quite different made up in a medium weight linen.  The collar becomes a flounce the flows down the front opening and curves around to form the back peplum. I must say that sewing does not always bring out the best in me.  I was quite the miss-cranky-pants when I was fiddling to get my muslin right, and children wanted things, you know, like to be fed, or driven somewhere compulsory.  The linen for this muslin was gifted to me, but it actually doesn't look too bad...maybe I should have had my fashion moments in the eighties with all that peach and apricot.


I have previously attempted a Chanel-style jacket, which is my favourite jacket, but I decided that this time around I did not want the jewel neckline. I wanted something a little less classic.

The fabric is a boucle, with a high percentage of cotton.  I was hoping that it would be what people in other climates might consider a summer weight jacket, but it is a bit bulkier and warmer than I was anticipating.

The pattern has darts.  I was wondering how best to mark the fabric.  I even paused from my frantic sew-a-jacket-in-a weekend pace to read some of the blog "Go Chanel or go Home".  The first dozen or so entries did not mention marking fabric.  It was then that I realised that the traditional Chanel style jackets have princess seams for a reason.  I decided to fudge my marking and remember this as a lesson for next time.

It also did not occur to me to match plaids.  Not that I would have had enough fabric anyway.  Next time, I need to order more fabric to match plaids.  By some fluke, the pockets pattern matched perfectly.  Only then I decided to move them to a more flattering position.  I did not muslin the pockets, but I would recommend including them in the muslin if you are going to trim them with a contrasting trim, as the trim gives a very strong horizontal line.

I trimmed the seam allowance and a bit more off the collar and sandwiched the selvedge fringe of the fabric between the upper and lower collar.  I wish that it had occurred to me to account for turn of cloth in this bulky fabric, because the collar does not sit as flat as it should.  I don't think it matters much on a frilly, fluffy jacket.  

I did not have enough fringe to trim the pockets, so I wove a few strands together to make a trim.  Nothing too fancy because I did not have many threads available.


I caught the collar between the jacket and the lining as I bagged the two together.  I quilted the jacket after it was constructed, as outlined in a Threads magazine article.  After reading the "Go Chanel or Go Home" blog I now know that typically the panels are quilted before construction.   If you look closely at my inside-out photos, you will see that I quilted in shapes to suit the pattern pieces, rather than vertical lines.  I used a walking foot for the quilting.


You can see that I have not trimmed and bound the armhole seam.  That is because I have enough fabric to make a matching blouse or dress or tank plus skirt.  I want to cut these out before I cut the bias strips necessary to complete the armhole.  That could be sometime off as they are not at the top of my sewing queue, and besides, it feels as though the winter weather is over here.

I love the lining fabric.  I have had the boucle a couple of years and was patiently waiting for the right colour silk charmeuse to present itself.  A cut length of this pink print fabric went on sale at EmmaOneSock.  I had admired a skirt and blouse made up in this same fabric on net-a-porter and had been stalking it for a while. It wasn't until it went on sale that I realised that it would be a perfect match for this jacket.  Nothing like a sale to get the creative juices flowing.  I'm not sure what this silk fabric is called, but it does not have the sheen of charmeuse and is more of a habotai weight.

A few quick photos on me.  I made the muslin one weekend, the jacket the next and put the finishing touches on today.  No time to dress up for a photo shoot though, so you get my spent-almost-all weekend gardening hairdo.  I wanted to blog tonight though, as I am anticipating a busy month with little or no sewing and blogging.  No front-on photos though, because the boucle is hardly slimming.  I have bought a length of white denim (on sale, again) which I will hopefully make up into slim jeans to match, with a top in the pink lining fabric to complete the outfit.  One day.





16 comments:

  1. Beautiful jacket. Love the variation with the collar, classic with a modern twist.

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  2. Beautiful jacket!Love how the collar ruffles very chic and girly!

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  3. I love how you took the classic idea of the Chanel-style jacket and made it more modern with adding the flounced ruffled collar and peplum. Your jacket is beautiful and you did an amazing job on it. LOVE IT!!!!

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  4. Love it. the collar is so attractive! i might have to go searching for the pattern. thanks for sharing your process. it always helps us envious sewers...

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  5. Beautiful! I love the lining. I agree about sales getting the creative juices flowing (much to dh's dismay!). Sometimes I buy fabric with no idea what to use it for but ending making something just right with it.

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  6. Fabulous!I love it with the white outfit, and the lining fabric is beautiful. And wow, you're fast!

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  7. Great jacket and I lurrrrvve the lining too.

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  8. Looks like you need to plan a quick trip to Melbourne in the next few weeks so you get a chance to wear your jacket...and do some more fabric shopping, of course. I love the colour. Goes so well with the white pants. Your muslin reminds me of the jacket you tried on in Myer when you were last up. I noticed it was on sale for $35 over the weekend.

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  9. That is such a pretty jacket, and such a good use of domestic squabble adreniline ;).
    I love the collar flounce,I would not have thought of it in boucle, but it looks amazing.

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  10. When I saw this photo on the side link of my blog I just couldn't believe it belonged to your blog ! I think I am just so used to seeing hot climate wear that a jacket took me completely by surprise. Such a pretty colour and interesting design feature. Go take yourself somewhere cool to show it off a little more.

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  11. Wow, that is pretty amazing. You must be the most efficient seamstress around! Just one weekend! I hope you were suitably admired by the other squabbler :)
    And I think the muslin looks quite gorgeous and pretty wearable too!

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  12. It looks great! I love the raw, fringed edges. Very impressive that you made it so quickly too!

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  13. Wow that is gorgeous. I have this pattern but somehow it frightens me.

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  14. Ack, my kids tend to need feeding, too. In fact, they eat all day long.

    But the jacket is beautiful - I even like the muslin! I like the details and drapiness of the collar combined with the boucle because it seems less boxy than boucle jackets usually are.

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  15. Wow, when I storm to my sewing room in a huff, I usually end up browsing magazines and daydreaming about my fantastic new wardrobe, I certainly don't come out with a Chanel jacket! Good tips here. I have that issue of Threads too, definitely a keeper...

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  16. It is a lovely jacket, and I lovely the modern funkiness of the collar, great work..... looks wonderful on you.

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