21.6.10

On the Sidelines by Twinkle


Today I am posting my new jumper.  I'm aware that "jumper" is not a universally understood term.  What would other people call it?  A sloppy joe?  A sweater?  A pullover?  Please excuse the headless shots. 
I do find headless shots disconcerting, but I have just had my wisdom teeth removed and the bruising does not fit with my colour scheme.  This 30 second photoshoot was taken by my son between activities this afternoon.

The fabric is a rayon blend double knit from EmmaOneSock.  The pattern is "On the Sidelines" from Twinkle Sews.  As usual, there are a lot of lovely details in the pattern;  oversized buttons along the boat neckline, kangaroo pouch with top-stitching details and rivets, topstitched details along the raglan seams and neckbands, raw-edged bands on the sleeves.  I'm sorry I forgot to get a closeup of the front neckline.  That back neckband looks a little odd...I wonder if it is that odd in real life or if it is just the camera angle??  I think it might be the camera angle.

I didn't like the construction techniques suggested in the book, so I did things differently.  This involved a lot of changes at the cutting stage, so if you are thinking about making this pattern, you may want to read my pattern review (I'll put a link here when the pattern review is complete).

When I was last making jeans, I had a lot of trouble with rivets.  Well, I found a new supply of rivets which are much easier to set.  They are not as flashy as the ones used by Wenlan Chia, but I'm just pleased that I found rivets that I can install.  There is a little shop in town, Bluebell Trading, which is mostly a gift shop, but also has a sign saying Singer Sewing Store.  It stocks a few quilting fabrics, a haberdashery line, and a lovely selection of buttons and ribbons.  The haberdashery line is called "Hemline".  I found a few goodies there, as well as the rivets.  I think I'll go back for more rivets.

I've had a few questions about how I print the patterns from Twinkle Sews.  Well, the answer is, "not very well"!  The patterns are provided in both pdf and adobe illustrator files.  I open the smaller adobe illustrator patterns in my version of Corel Draw.  Sometimes this works well and I can delete pieces I don't want, move pieces around, make changes etc.  Other times, the pattern labels end up all over the place and I have trouble getting them on the right pieces.  Corel Draw is new to me so I am willing to accept that this is a user error.  When I print them, the tile marks end up in funny places because they have been put in place for letter paper and I use A4, but I can usually work out what goes where.

The larger files have been zipped and I can't unzip them in Corel.  Then I have to use the pdf version.  I just let my computer do what it does and I did not realise for my first few projects that it was shrinking the patterns to fit on A4 paper.  This meant that the patterns were shrunk to 93% of their size.  I didn't notice, but that may be because a lot of the patterns are for loose fitting clothing?  Anyway, when I realised this, I started unclicking the "shrink to fit" box and printing full size, which means that a little bit is lost off the vertical edges.  I just stick all the bits of paper together with no overlap on the vertical edges.

I get a lot of error with all that sticking bits of paper together.  Seamlines often don't quite match.  Things end up a bit skewiff.  I just go with it and do what I can.  I usually compare the pattern to the most similar Vogue pattern I have to assess the fit and make any fitting changes before I cut into fabric.  I also read the instructions through a number of times to understand the construction before I start cutting, to know where it is important for bits to match up.

Each file only contains 1 size, so you pretty much want to determine your size before printing, otherwise that is a lot of trees being wasted.

That's all not very helpful for somebody who wants help printing, is it?  Sometimes I think it is easier to study the details in the Twinkle patterns and then adapt another pattern with these details.  I think Kwiksew 3045 would be a good start for this one.  Just add some external facings along the neckline, sew on the buttons, shorten the sleeves and add topstitched sleevebands.  I guess you just need to decide where you prefer your sewing pain to be??  And on that note, I need to top up my painkillers, so the pattern review will have to wait.  Good night.

14 comments:

  1. Very cute jumper. Thanks for all the information on the pattern printing. Hope you feel better soon.

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  2. I hope your face feels better soon! Great jumper!

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  3. Oh yes! I'm so glad you reviewed this - it's my favourite from the book and I just bought sweatshirting to make it this fall.

    Thanks SO much about altering the patterns in Illustrator, too - that's an excellent idea and I would've never thought to do it myself.

    Your sweatshirt is fabulous, though, and you've made me really want to make it ASAP!

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  4. wow - that looks like a useful and fun top! I love the detailing on it - casual but eye catching.

    Hope you make a speedy recovery.

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  5. In my neck of the woods, it'd be a sweatshirt. Very fun! I especially like the unique neckline.

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  6. WOW, it's great! Such interesting design details. Pity about all the fussing-about you've had to do to get the patterns printed out! But you have triumphed :o)

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  7. What an interesting, yet casual jumper.I like all the interesting features. The neckline is very groovy. I think it looks particularly nice with the scarf - I think the brown probably needs a colour like that so it doesn't look too drab. Even a bright scarf worn as a belt would look good. Another Twinkle win!

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  8. I absolutely need something like this. There is also a similar pattern idea in Burda 11/08.

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  9. I feel your wisdom teeth pain - I loathed having mine out. Just as well you have a funky new jumper to cosy up in!

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  10. cute! i've been wanting to make this pattern! i'm glad to see it turned out so well.

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  11. Thanks for your tips on printing the Twinkle patterns! I'm glad to see another of your Twinkle creations!

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  12. oh, you're twinkle sewing again, I 'm kind of not motivated to stick papers at the moment especially that european standard paper is larger than the one twinkle uses; your sweater came out well, especially the rivets detail.

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  13. Thanks for the tips. This is lovely! I am hoping to do this pullover soon and have no idea where I can get tricot. I was hoping if you could advise me on whether it is a necessity or can be done without? Look forward to reading your full review!

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  14. This looks great! I am commenting with a question as I have just started sewing the On the Sidelines sweatshirt as well, and am a bit confused with the instructions. What am I supposed to do with the long skinny "neckline facing" piece? There are no pictures and the instructions are vague so I'm baffled as to how it is supposed to fit in with the curved neckline pieces! Any help would be appreciated :)

    Thanks!
    Abby

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